Question: What saying does Old Man Warner recall about the lottery?

“Seventy-seventh year I been in the lottery,” Old Man Warner said as he went through the crowd. “Seventy-seventh time.” As he has been through seventy-seven lotteries and has survived them all, he views any fear as a weakness. Old Man Warner was saying, “Come on, come on, everyone.”

What saying does Old Man Warner quote about the lottery What does this saying say about the possible origin and purpose of the lottery?

What Warner was saying was that because the town was adhering to the tradition of the lottery the town would have good luck in the coming year. The people believed that the lottery was a direct influence on their prosperity.

How does Old Man Warner feel about the lottery?

Old Man Warner, the oldest man in town, has participated in seventy-seven lotteries and is a staunch advocate for keeping things exactly the way they are. … He believes, illogically, that the people who want to stop holding lotteries will soon want to live in caves, as though only the lottery keeps society stable.

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Why doesn’t Old Man Warner want to give up the lottery what does he think will happen if the lottery no longer took place?

There are three reasons why Old Man Warner does not want to give up the Lottery. First, Old Man Warner actually believes that the Lottery is good for the town. Twice he calls young people a “pack of fools,” for even considering doing away with the Lottery. Tied to this point, he is a very traditional man.

What is the expression used by Old Man Warner to defend the lottery What does it mean?

“The Lottery” is about capital-T Tradition, the kind of tradition that “no one liked to upset” (5). … So, for Old Man Warner, the lottery is associated with agriculture and with plenty; it allows the community to guard against nameless, declining fortune.

What does he say will happen without a lottery?

In Old Man Warner’s eyes, doing away with the lottery would be akin to going back to primitive times. He believes that society would fail without the lottery. His belief, likely shared by many in their community, indicates how people could be willing to accept such a violent tradition.

What is the symbolism of Old Man Warner?

The stones used as weapons, the symbol of human violence because people in the past used stones as things to invent tools, to fight, and to kill things. Therefore, the Old Man Warner’s name and the stones represented as a caution, a warning of the dead that was very dangerous.

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Why does Tessie say the lottery is unfair?

Tessie thinks the lottery is unfair because she won. If someone else won, she would not have complained at all. … This is an example of situational irony in that the readers do not expect that the winner of the lottery will be killed.

What is the irony in the lottery?

The plot as a whole in “The Lottery” is filled with ironic twists. The whole idea of a lottery is to win something, and the reader is led to believe that the winner will receive some prize, when in actuality they will be stoned to death by the rest of the villagers.

What does the black dot symbolize in the lottery?

In the story, “The Lottery,” the black box symbolizes the judgment of the members of the town. The list of names represent those who will be judged—one of whom will die. The black spot is symbolic of the person from the town who is chosen to die.

Do you agree with Mrs Hutchinson is the lottery unfair?

Answer: Mrs. Hutchinson does not find the lottery unfair, until her husband is picked as a winner. It is only when the lottery directly affects her life that she complains about it.

Why is Mrs Hutchinson upset?

Hutchinson upset? Mrs. Hutchinson is upset when she draws the slip of paper with the black spot because this indicates that she has “won” the lottery, meaning she will become the town’s annual sacrifice.

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