What could the lottery represent?

The lottery represents any action, behavior, or idea that is passed down from one generation to the next that’s accepted and followed unquestioningly, no matter how illogical, bizarre, or cruel. … Nevertheless, the lottery continues, simply because there has always been a lottery.

What does The Lottery box itself symbolize?

In “The Lottery,” Jackson says that the black box represents tradition, hence the villagers’ reluctance to replace it, despite its shabbiness. The box also implicitly symbolizes death. This symbolic aspect of the box, however, comes more from its function than its form. Its blackness symbolizes death.

What is The Lottery trying to teach us?

In “The Lottery,” the moral lesson or theme is that one should not blindly follow traditions simply because they’re tradition.

How does The Lottery relate to real life?

“The Lottery” relates to real life because it shows us how people can easily be repressed by the communities they inhabit. Most of us derive great strength and comfort from the communities in which we live. But too many people are repressed by the communities in which they live.

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What does the black dot represent in the lottery?

In the story, “The Lottery,” the black box symbolizes the judgment of the members of the town. The list of names represent those who will be judged—one of whom will die. The black spot is symbolic of the person from the town who is chosen to die.

What is the main message of the lottery?

The main themes in “The Lottery” are the vulnerability of the individual, the importance of questioning tradition, and the relationship between civilization and violence. The vulnerability of the individual: Given the structure of the annual lottery, each individual townsperson is defenseless against the larger group.

Why are the children happy in The Lottery?

Why are the children happy? They have won the lottery. Their family has been chosen for the lottery. This is the town’s final lottery.

What is the irony in The Lottery?

The plot as a whole in “The Lottery” is filled with ironic twists. The whole idea of a lottery is to win something, and the reader is led to believe that the winner will receive some prize, when in actuality they will be stoned to death by the rest of the villagers.

What is the moral lesson of The Lottery Ticket?

The main theme of the story “The Lottery Ticket” by Anton Chekhov is that money can corrupt the soul. The prospect of a huge lottery win makes Ivan and Masha look at each other with hatred and suspicion, each one believing that the other will be negatively changed by their sudden windfall.

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What is the climax of the story the lottery?

In “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson, the climax is when Tessie is declared the “winner,” the falling action includes the townspeople gathering around her and stoning her, and the resolution is when the town’s life returns to normal.

Why did Tessie get stoned in the lottery?

Tessie is stoned to death because she’s the “winner” of the lottery. The townspeople seem to believe that unless they sacrifice one of their own, crops will fail. It’s an old tradition, and very few think to question it at all.

Did the lottery happen in real life?

“The Lottery” was written in 1948 and published in “The New Yorker” while the author, Shirly Jackson, lived in a bucolic New England town, typical of the post-war American experience. It received a response that had never been seen before by “The New Yorker”. …

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