How is the story the lottery organized?

Therefore, the story “The Lottery” is structured in the same manner as any other traditional short story with a clear beginning, middle, and end. However, it is the language that is used throughout the narrative what creates in the reader the confusion as to what is really going on.

What is the point of the story The Lottery?

The point is, follow the rules, because those are the rules. The point of the story as a whole to the reader though is a warning against blindly following rules. The lottery system seems stupid to the reader only because most readers would question the law in the first place.

What important preparation is made a night before The Lottery?

The night before the drawing the two men prepare slips for every household in the community–but not for every individual member of every household. The night before the lottery, Mr. Summers and Mr. Graves made up the slips of paper and put them in the box, and it was then taken to the safe of Mr.

Why did Tessie get stoned in The Lottery?

Tessie is stoned to death because she’s the “winner” of the lottery. The townspeople seem to believe that unless they sacrifice one of their own, crops will fail. It’s an old tradition, and very few think to question it at all.

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What does The Lottery teach you?

The moral lessons of “The Lottery,” therefore, are that evil comes of conformity, and that the worst things we do are often things so familiar to us that we do not even trouble to think of them in moral terms or question their value.

What is the main conflict of The Lottery?

Person versus society is the major conflict in “The Lottery” because the conflict revolves around Tessie Hutchinson’s struggle against her town, the citizens of which insist on observing a ritual of sacrifice each year in blind adherence to tradition.

Why does Tessie think The Lottery is unfair?

Tessie thinks the lottery is unfair because she won. If someone else won, she would not have complained at all. … This is an example of situational irony in that the readers do not expect that the winner of the lottery will be killed.

Why do they kill in The Lottery?

It was a ritual sacrifice: the community believed, even though the story takes place in twentieth-century America, that they needed a blood offering in order to have a good harvest. To find a sacrificial victim, the community holds an annual lottery. … She “won” the lottery by getting her ticket drawn on the lottery day.

What is the irony in The Lottery?

The plot as a whole in “The Lottery” is filled with ironic twists. The whole idea of a lottery is to win something, and the reader is led to believe that the winner will receive some prize, when in actuality they will be stoned to death by the rest of the villagers.

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